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Schroon Lake Association contributes to storm water project

Volunteer hours count toward town’s match

The Schroon Lake Association volunteers will play a major role in a storm water run off project to be completed this fall.

The Schroon Lake Association volunteers will play a major role in a storm water run off project to be completed this fall.

— The Schroon Lake Association volunteers will play a major role in a storm water run off project to be completed this fall.

The $230,000 state grant that will fund the project requires a match from the local community. To help the town of Schroon reach that match, SLA volunteers have completed 1,100 hours of work.

“Our board members held educational programs, trained and supervised lake stewards, scouted for milfoil and did scores of other things over the past nine months,” said Paul Conolly of the SLA steering committee. “These hours, which will be valued at $25 an hour, act as matching monies to be used to keep storm water from polluting our lake.”

The Warren County Soil & Water Conservation District will lead the project. The town of Schroon will provide in-kind services such as manpower, equipment and supplies to help meet its required match, Supervisor Mike Marnell said.

Marnell said the project will create a storm water collection system in the hamlet leading to a filtration bed at the town boat launch on Dock Street. The storm water will be treated there and released into the lake.

The filtration bed will be constructed under the parking lot at the boat launch, Marnell said, making it unobtrusive.

“The town is expected to match the funds spent by the state,” SLA President Mark Granger said. “Our board, through its volunteer efforts, has given the town a $27,500 credit which will not have to be paid by the taxpayers.”

Marnell and Schroon officials lauded the Schroon Lake Association for its contributions.

“This is another example of local citizens working with their town government to make our wonderful lake better and safer,” said Roger Friedman, a town trustee and SLA member.

Chuck Harste, SLA vice president, said some of those volunteer hours were spent in monitoring lake water quality as SLA members went out and sampled Schroon Lake water for testing under the Citizens Statewide Lake Assessment Program. CSLAP is a volunteer lake monitoring and education program that is managed by state Department of Environmental Conservation and New York State Federation of Lake Associations.

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