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Ticonderoga board decides on water project

Gooseneck, Lake George to remain primary water sources

Ticonderoga’s water project will include Gooseneck Pond, Lake George and a recently-completed well.

Ticonderoga’s water project will include Gooseneck Pond, Lake George and a recently-completed well.

— Ticonderoga’s water project will include Gooseneck Pond, Lake George and a recently-completed well.

The town board voted in favor of the plan March 4, directing its engineering firm to design a system that will use water from all three sources.

“There’s been a lot of effort and hard work by the town board in a short amount of time to reach this point,” Supervisor Bill Grinnell said. “I’m proud of the board. This will give Ti good water for the foreseeable future.”

It seemed Ticonderoga was committed to a groundwater project in December, but that changed when Grinnell took office Jan. 1. Grinnell, who made the water project a central part of his campaign for office, asked the town board to reconsider the project in his first meeting.

The board agreed to get a second opinion from Jarrett Engineers of Glens Falls. With that second opinion in hand, the board then met with its engineer, AES Engineers, and hashed out a new plan.

New York State has ordered upgrades and/or new water sources be in place by 2016. Failure to meet the 2016 state deadline could result in fines of up to $37,000 a day for the town.

In 2009 the state Department of Health ordered Ti to replace or cover the Gooseneck reservoir, which was created in 1931. The town developed a plan to replace the reservoir with tanks, but an inspection discovered problems with the Gooseneck dam and with transmission lines.

Gooseneck was designed to serve the entire town, but over time demand exceeded Gooseneck’s capacity. In 1965 a Lake George water supply was developed for emergency use. Eventually, Lake George water became necessary to meet daily demand.

During an inspection the state also found problems at the Baldwin Road filtration plant that handles Lake George water.

Ticonderoga then began considering an upgrade of the entire water system, utilizing groundwater sources.

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