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The rhythm of nature offers inspiration for Warrensburg artist’s work

Warrensburg artist Mary Landenberger feeds one of her sheep — that provide her with the wool she spins and uses to create her fiber-art scarves.

Warrensburg artist Mary Landenberger feeds one of her sheep — that provide her with the wool she spins and uses to create her fiber-art scarves. Photo by Thom Randall.

— Perched on a stool in Riverside Gallery, Mary Leonard Landenberger pulled and twisted wool in her fingers during a break from arranging some of her fiber art and pottery for display.

The woolen “roving” she was creating would someday soon be worked into the fabric of one of her wearable felt art creations, she said. The wool was shorn from ‘Zipper,” one of the sheep she’s raised, and it would be blended into other fibers in one of her art scarves, she said.

“It will serve as a memorial to him — It’s nice to have his wool and have him still with me,” she said. “It’s about changing energy — Life goes on.”

Not long afterwards, Landenberger was in a pasture, feeding two of her sheep, then cuddling a one-day-old baby chick she adopted after its mother abandoned it. Later, she was in her studio, molding a ceramic bowl on a potters wheel. Finishing her work, she reviewed the progress of the plants growing her garden. Soon after, she chased her large pet turtle Corrina through a field.

Like many other artists in the Adirondacks, the rhythm of nature serves as a source of artistic inspiration for Landenberger, she explained as she pursued her day’s activities.

A Warrensburg resident who grew up on the east shore of Lake George, she is an avid kayaker, swimmer, hiker, wanderer, animal nurturer, amateur naturalist, sustainability enthusiast, gardener — and artist.

Whether it’s a rushing stream, a vivid sunset, autumn leaves scattered in the woods, streaks of mineral deposits in a rock, or the morning mist rising off a remote pond, Landenberger subliminally absorbs the beauty — and the colors, textures and forms she witnesses influence her artwork, she said.

For decades, her artistic vision has been developed through both formal studies and sharing ideas with artists and artisans in the Adirondacks, Glens Falls and Saratoga areas, she said.

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