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Two public hearings remain before Elizabethtown decides on comprehensive plan

The Hamlets 3 project is an effort to help local communities in the Adirondack Park find ways to revitalize their economies while preserving their natural resources. Pictured above are cluster models projecting possible expansion zones in Elizabethtown.

The Hamlets 3 project is an effort to help local communities in the Adirondack Park find ways to revitalize their economies while preserving their natural resources. Pictured above are cluster models projecting possible expansion zones in Elizabethtown.

ELIZABETHTOWN — Two public hearings remain before Elizabethtown will formally decide if they will implement a comprehensive plan, a toolbox for the town’s future that sketches out everything from cementing a community identity to an overhaul of land use and zoning laws.

Nan Stolzenburg, the consultant who co-drafted the plan alongside members of the town’s planning board and input from the public, spoke for nearly an hour on Wednesday, July 9 at what was billed as a casual Q&A session at the town hall designed to explain the plan to the community.

“This is a chance to get informed,” planning board member Elena Borstein told the audience before Stolzenburg’s presentation. “So when you come back, you can be informed. We can still make changes.”

‘WE CAN GO TO THE SEVENTH’

Stolzenburg said the plan, which is now in its sixth draft, can go to the seventh depending on the scope of public feedback.

If the public has no major concerns, a separate draft will not be necessary.

Two hearings are required before the town board will vote to adopt the plan. The first, called by the planning board, is the last chance for the public to request major surgery.

That meeting is tentatively scheduled for Tuesday, Aug. 12 at 6:30 p.m. at the town hall.

After that, the town board will hold a similar meeting to hammer out any outstanding questions. The date for that hearing remains unclear.

There are only two other mandates, Stolzenburg said.

The first is that the town board is required to submit the plan to the county for review. Essex County officials then have 30 days to chime in with any comments.

After that — and the county can simply opt to decline to comment, which counts as tacit approval — the state must sign off on a SEQRA review to determine if adverse environmental impacts will occur as a result of the plan’s implementation.

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