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Board airs concerns over Lake George hotel project

An architect's revised rendition of the proposed Lake George Marriott hotel shows the Adirondack-style architecture, staggered rooflines and facade offsets that village planning board members had suggested last fall. Recently, the board members asked for more information on the project, while posing questions about screening from adjacent properties.

An architect's revised rendition of the proposed Lake George Marriott hotel shows the Adirondack-style architecture, staggered rooflines and facade offsets that village planning board members had suggested last fall. Recently, the board members asked for more information on the project, while posing questions about screening from adjacent properties. Photo by Thom Randall.

— Lake George Village Planning Board members have requested more information before they vote on preliminary plans for the proposed Marriott Courtyard hotel project on Canada St. in downtown Lake George.

Board members provided a list of requests Jan. 15 for project developer Dave Kenny, including a “balloon test,” or inflating balloons and positioning them 70 feet or so off the ground to simulate the size of the proposed six-story hotel and conference center.

Concerns voiced at the meeting included the location of the patio which overlooks a nearby school’s playground; some type of buffer between a patio off the hotel’s pool on the north end of the building — which borders the school’s property line; and the view of the roof from the back of the building and how that roof might be used.

Lake George Waterkeeper Chris Navitsky recommended a “green roof” which would encompass roof-top plants or grass to absorb water and reduce run-off.

Another concern raised by Navitsky was the increase in sewage flow to the village wastewater treatment plant resulting from the development. Questions were raised about whether the increased sewage to be treated would above the plant’s capacity, or result in excess pollution. In recent years, the treated effluent emanating from the plant has contained higher nitrate levels than the state allows.

A change in the local code that previously allowed only three story buildings in the village paved the way for Kenny’s application for the 120-room facility.

“We’re going through the process,” village planning board chairman Robert Mastrantoni said. “We want to make sure we get everything right with this project and make everyone happy.”

For the project to move forward, the planning board needs to approve a Special Use permit and a site plan for the project, and the Adirondack Park Agency must also approve it, which is expected to take a few months.

Another public meeting on the project is scheduled for Feb. 10 at 7:30 p.m.

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