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A peanut railroad | Keeseville Column

The final film in the “Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Story” series “The Loving Story” will air this Saturday, March first at 1 p.m. in the Plattsburgh Public Library with a community discussion to follow afterwards. This is free to the public and hosted in part by the library and the North Country Underground Historical Association.

Visited the Keeseville Elementary School website and came across this and thought I would pass it on to my readers: “The Keeseville Elementary School Choruses are in need of an accompanist! 

“We have two concerts during the school year (December & May) and hold our weekly rehearsals between 1:30 and 2 p.m. If you or someone you know would be willing to accompany the KES choruses, please leave a voicemail for  Mrs. Barbara Boulerice at the school (834-2839 ext. 7318).”

Just a reminder that the Anderson Falls Heritage Society is currently closed for the winter until April 15 but is available for appointments. Contact either Colin McDonough at 834-6032 or Betty Brelia at 834-7138 to arrange a time.

Keeseville was the home of a thriving peanut railroad at one point in history. A peanut railroad is so named as it is smaller both in terms of the locomotives as well as the gauge of the rail ties as well. Back in the late 1880s there was a need to safely move heavy product from several factories in Keeseville over to the lake by Port Kent, and so the Keeseville, AuSable Chasm and Lake Champlain Railroad Company was born. The total length of the track was 5.6 miles with the tremendous and impressive feat of engineering for a bridge over the Chasm built by the Berlin Iron Bridge Company from out of Connecticut. The bridge was almost 250 feet long and stood over a depth of 150 feet. The train could not turn around. It was pushed one way and pulled the other. During its high point it was making seven round trips daily and three on Sundays taking a total of 20 minutes to make the trip. It ceased operation in the 1920s. The bridge was demolished and the site of the station is now the North Country Club Restaurant. Enjoy your week.

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