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Crown Point brothers develop growing business

Bruce and Brad Peters of Buck Mountain Maple Syrup in Crown Point are ready to start tapping trees with the help of their mascot, Marlee.

Bruce and Brad Peters of Buck Mountain Maple Syrup in Crown Point are ready to start tapping trees with the help of their mascot, Marlee. Photo by Seth Lang.

— One of the many signs that winter is at its end is the warm February sun pushing the temperature above freezing.

For the Peters family this time of year means getting out in the woods and tapping maple trees for their business, Buck Mountain Maple Syrup in Crown Point.

The Peters brothers, Bruce, Eric, Brad and Jason, began tapping about 150 trees for syrup in 2008 around their own houses, making about 20 gallons of syrup to supply their families for the year.

In 2011, Bruce was talking to his uncle from Norwood, who’d been making maple syrup for over 30 years and persuaded him to look into expanding their operation.

Since then, they’ve taken their uncle’s advice and today tap about 1,000 trees. Last year they gathered 21,000 gallons of sap, making 430 gallons of syrup.

“About 2-3 percent of sap is actually sugar; on average it takes about 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup,” said Brad.

Last year was a good year for Buck Mountain Maple Syrup, but the Peters brothers expect this year’s early sap to be even better because of the cold winter and the recent fresh snow.

“We’re dependent upon the weather just like any other crop,” said Brad.

In cold climates, maple trees store starch in their trunks and roots before the winter. The starch is then converted to sugar that rises in the sap in the spring. Maple trees can be tapped by boring holes into their trunks and collecting the exuded sap. The sap is heated to evaporate much of the water, leaving the concentrated syrup behind.

The Peters’ operation uses a reverse-osmosis machine to take a portion of water out of the sap before it’s boiled, increasing processing efficiency. Syrup boiled too long will eventually crystallize and under-boiled syrup will be watery, and will quickly spoil. The finished syrup has a density of 66°.

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