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Lake George regulations could impact Schroon Lake

SLA president expects increased boat traffic on Schroon Lake

Will new boating regulations on Lake George affect Schroon Lake? Mark Granger, president of the Schroon Lake Association, believes so.

Will new boating regulations on Lake George affect Schroon Lake? Mark Granger, president of the Schroon Lake Association, believes so.

— Reducing the threat of invasives to the Schroon watershed and preserving water quality are the top priorities of the Schroon lake Association, Granger said.

Toward those ends, The Schroon Lake Association will again join with the East Shore Schroon Lake Association, the town of Schroon and the town of Horicon to fund a lake steward program again this year.

Stewards will inspect boats being placed in Schroon Lake at the Schroon and Horicon boat launches 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. five days a week this summer.

“This will provide boat inspection to prevent boats and trailers from bringing invasive plants into our lakes,” Granger said.

There are also plans for invasive species reconnaissance and emergency milfoil removal in 2014, the SLA president said.

The Schroon Lake Association will continue to monitor water quality this year with the help of Steve LaMere, the lake manager, and volunteers.

“We are also funding continuing water quality sampling for the entirety of the lake. Keeping track of contaminants and bacteria is critical to our lake’s health,” Granger said. “Our volunteers, led by Chuck Harste, work with Steve LaMere and CSLAP to do multiple samplings every year.“

CSLAP is the Citizens Statewide Lake Assessment Program, a volunteer lake monitoring and education program that is managed by state Department of Environmental Conservation and New York State Federation of Lake Associations.

Granger said a comprehensive report looking at Schroon Lake water quality the past five years in now being prepared. The report, when completed, will be available on the SLA website, www.schroonlakeassociation.com

“The results are good so far, but merit vigilance, as phosphates and salt are rising in some areas,” he said.

The Schroon Lake Association will also work this year to educate property owners near the lake about potential septic issues and the dangers they pose to the lake.

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