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Hockey tourney to raise funds for kids charity

MVP Kids’ mascot Timmy the Tiger with several of the volunteers who make up MVP Kids. Founder and Director Katie Bond credits volunteers with helping MVP Kids to exist.

MVP Kids’ mascot Timmy the Tiger with several of the volunteers who make up MVP Kids. Founder and Director Katie Bond credits volunteers with helping MVP Kids to exist.

— Law enforcement officers from two states and two different countries are descending on the village of Rouses Point, but instead of night sticks, they’ll be swinging hockey sticks.

The second annual “Rouses Point Civic Center Border Bash” hockey tournament is being held March 1, with all proceeds going to the local charity MVP Kids. MVP Kids is a children’s sports league for children age five to 12 with autism spectrum disorders.

“It gives them the opportunity to enjoy the same benefits of sports that other kids enjoy,” said U.S. Border Patrol Agent Norman Lague, who is organizing Border Bash.

“We’re a vehicle for providing awareness for MVP Kids.”

The tournament will be made up of teams of law enforcement and corrections officers from New York, Vermont and Canada. Teams will consist of two border patrol teams, plus teams from both the US and Canadian ports of entry, Clinton Correctional Facility, the RCMP, and FCI Ray Brook. One other Canadian team is being sought. Last year’s tournament was won by the team from Clinton Correctional Facility.

Along with the two day tournament, raffles of items donated by local Northern Tier businesses will be taking place, plus other fund-raising activities. Lague credits numerous Rouses Point and surrounding area businesses with donating numerous items to be raffled off.

Katie Bond, founder and director of MVP Kids, says she was thrilled when she received the phone call from Lague, offering to support her organization. Bond founded MVP Kids five years ago as a way to help children with spectrum disorders to socialize, learn sportsmanship, and just play sports with other children.

“We’re a non-competitive sporting league,” said Bond. “Our sports don’t look like other sports. We stress sportsmanship, something that is usually hard for kids with spectrum disorders.”

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