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Vote approaching on elementary school roof repair project

The roof on Warrensburg Elementary School is leaking so badly that school personnel have been putting out buckets to catch water dripping through the ceilings. A proposition to replace the roof is set for Tuesday Sept. 16. Because state aid is paying for the bulk of the project and the remaining funds have already been set aside for repairs, the $1.24 million project is not expected to raise local taxes whatsoever.

The roof on Warrensburg Elementary School is leaking so badly that school personnel have been putting out buckets to catch water dripping through the ceilings. A proposition to replace the roof is set for Tuesday Sept. 16. Because state aid is paying for the bulk of the project and the remaining funds have already been set aside for repairs, the $1.24 million project is not expected to raise local taxes whatsoever. Photo by Thom Randall.

— The local elementary school’s roof is leaking so badly that school personnel are setting out buckets to contain water dripping through the ceiling — and the school district is seeking local residents’ approval of a building project to replace the entire roof.

A referendum to spend as much as $1.24 million to repair the roof is to go before the school district residents in a vote set for Tuesday Sept. 16.

Warrensburg Central Schools Superintendent John Goralski provided an overview of the project Aug. 11. Plans call for the project to receive $880,000 in state aid, and the remainder of the sum is to be drawn from a capital reserve account — endorsed by district voters in May — which contains money left over from a previous project to make renovations to the high school, Goralski said.

The project will not require any additional money from taxpayers, he continued, so approval of the project will have no impact on the tax rate.

Installed more than 20 years ago, the existing roof has deteriorated substantially and can’t be patched up, Goralski said. Water has saturated insulation located directly underneath the roof, and water has also been running down into the walls and ceilings of the building.

“Our maintenance department has done everything they can over the years to address the leaks,” he said, noting that roof repairs are to begin next spring — after the state education officials approve the project. He said plans call for the new roof to be in place by Sept. 1, 2015.

“It’s not a glamorous project, but it needs to be done,” he said.

Goralski added that there’s no evidence yet that the walls or ceilings have begun to mold or mildew, and the district’s architects and engineers have predicted that black mold or other hazardous conditions aren’t likely to develop over the next year.

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