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Sportman’s Show | Keeseville Column

The Chesterfield Rod and Gun Club, 59 Green Street, in Keeseville, will be having their annual Sportman’s Show at the end of this month, Saturday, April 26, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, April 27, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. The show will have forty tables with gun dealers, hunting accessories, ammo, archery, crafts, antiques and a live Birds of Prey show. Breakfast and lunch will be available and parking is free. The event will be $5 for adults and children under 12 for free. Contact Joe Huber at 518 643-2651 for more details.

As I mentioned in a previous column, the North Country Honor Flight is raffling off a 2004 Harley Davidson Fatboy. The raffle will be limited to 1,000 tickets which are available for a $25 donation. Drawing will be held on July 22. Interested parties should contact the Honor Flight by calling 834-9901 for more details.

Happy birthday to arguably Keeseville’s most famous resident, William Henry Jackson. He would have been one 171 years old this April 4. He did pass away at the age of 99back in June 30, 1942 in New York City and was laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery. He picked up a passion for art from his water-color painting mother, Harriet Maria Allen. While serving in the Civil War including the Battle of Gettysburg, Jackson sketched many drawings of a soldier’s daily life which he sent to his mother who saved them. These would become the earliest of his famous works. After the Civil War he began a lucrative artist’s career in the Northeast of America. Fleeing the Northeast after breaking up with his fiancée his career really took off as he documented the expansion of the west both in photographs, paintings and drawings. He is most known now for his photographs of Native Americans and Yellowstone National Park but documented much of the then unknown frontier. His work is still on display in many museums across the country with the largest collection permanently on display at the Scott’s Bluff National Monument in Nebraska, part of the National Park Services. You can find a lot of his work at whjcollection.com.

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