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Ti to budget for building maintenance, repairs

Study identifies needs in town buildings

The first time, Ticonderoga’s town budget will include a dedicated fund for building maintenance and repair in 2014. An 18-month review of town-owned buildings has been completed by a private firm with recommendations for the future. Some of those recommendations will be included in the 2014 town budget.

The first time, Ticonderoga’s town budget will include a dedicated fund for building maintenance and repair in 2014. An 18-month review of town-owned buildings has been completed by a private firm with recommendations for the future. Some of those recommendations will be included in the 2014 town budget.

— “I also requested Alfandre assess moving police to the Community Building and relocating some town office departments to the armory,” Malaney said. “However, cost of renovations, historic building restrictions and safety issues proved to be too expensive.”

Alfandre’s recommendation for cost effective use and efficiency is to eventually consolidate four town departments and equipment — police, highway, public works and grounds — in a new facility at the site of the current highway garage on Race Track Road.

“The deteriorated metal highway garage has long outlived its 25-year life and the police department has structural issues,” Malaney said.

A new building would be costly, the supervisor acknowledged, and is not feasible at this time.

“We’re always looking for grant and funding opportunities,” Malaney said. “Consolidation (of departments) would qualify the town for shared service grants and funding, which would be identified and applied for by the town’s professional grant writers at PRIDE, Essex County Planning Department and Alfandre.

“Grant funding a long process, but we’ll pursue it,” she said.

If funding is found for a new municipal building to house those departments, the current police building could be sold and returned to the tax rolls, Malaney said.

The police situation could sort itself out, Malaney said. A proposal by North Country Community College to convert the former Lowe’s building into an applied technology center includes an offer to house Ti police there.

“The NCC College-Lowe’s project offered a home to the police rent free for up to 10 years with no construction costs and no hidden fees,” Malaney said. “This could potentially be an enormous taxpayer savings and is being factored into the current long range planning.”

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