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Invasive species found spreading in Putnam

Asian clams located in Glenburnie

Kristen Rohne of the Lake George Association searches for Asian clams. The invasive species has been found at a private boat launch area in Glenburnie.

Kristen Rohne of the Lake George Association searches for Asian clams. The invasive species has been found at a private boat launch area in Glenburnie.

— Spring post-treatment survey results suggested that the seven acres of mats placed on the lake floor last winter successfully killed off populations of Asian clams in Lake George. However, a two-week lakewide survey currently in its second week reveals that the invasive clams are showing up in new locations as well as spreading beyond the treated areas.

New clam populations have been identified by volunteers and staff from the various organizations that make up the Lake George Asian Clam Task Force. New locations with clams have been found at Million Dollar Beach, Sandy Bay, Cotton Point and Basin Bay in southern Lake George, as well as the private boat launch area in Glenburnie in the Northern Basin.

“We have a sound and proven method to kill off the clams that we treat, but it’s not enough to contain them,” said Walt Lender of Ticonderoga, executive director of the Lake George Association.

“While it is unfortunate that we have moved beyond an eradication and containment strategy to a long-term management and control operation, we are still able to build upon our past successes to learn more about the clams so that we can better manage them. The detection of the juvenile stage of the clams is the challenge; control has been successful where clams larger than 2mm are found. We need to continue surveys to document the rate of spread and study the species in more detail to understand what we can do to best manage the population” said Meg Modley, the Lake Champlain Basin Program’s aquatic invasive species management coordinator.

“This latest news demands targeted research aimed at understanding the lifecycle of the Asian clam which will open new doors to more effective treatments that can stop the spread and limit impacts to the lake to the fullest extent possible,” said Dr. Sandra Nierzwicki-Bauer, director of the Darrin Fresh Water Institute.

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