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Ticonderoga mulls trash station’s future

Current system lost $29,000 last year

Ticonderoga officials are searching for ways to stem the flow of red ink at the town trash transfer station.

Ticonderoga officials are searching for ways to stem the flow of red ink at the town trash transfer station.

— Ticonderoga officials are searching for ways to stem the flow of red ink at the town trash transfer station.

The trash operation, which is part of the Essex County solid waste system, was designed to be self-supporting, but it cost local taxpayers $29,000 last year, according to Deb Malaney, town supervisor.

“More and more people are contacting with private haulers, ACE and Casella, that provide door-to-door service,” Malaney said. “We’re taking in less trash, but our expenses have remainded about the same. The (town) board has decided to look at alternatives, for ways to save money there.”

In the past year Ticonderoga has raised its disposal fee from 10 cents a pound to 15 cents and started allowing people to pay by check at the transfer station. Those moves have done little to offset the financial loses, Malaney said.

The town’s contract for solid waste services with Essex County expires next fall. With that in mind, trustees have requested proposals from private solid waste companies that may be interested in taking over the Ti trash station. Ticonderoga owns its trash station, although Essex County owns the equipment at the site.

Malaney pointed out neighboring Washington County has privatized its solid waste operations.

“John LaPointe (Putnam supervisor) called me and we discussed the situation in Washington County,” Malaney said. “He suggested several companies that may provide the same or better services.”

Putnam is in Washington County.

“This is all in the discussion stage; no decisions have been made,” Malaney said. “The town board has an obligation to provide services for the least amount of money possible.”

Privatizing Ticonderoga’s trash disposal system may help the town budget, but it could be costly to Ti residents. A private contractor could increase disposal fees charged to users.

“We’ve heard from companies who think we’re charging too much now,” Malaney said. “They seem to think they could make a profit by charging less and cutting expenses.”

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