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Chrome, tail-fins, lavish paint - even bare steel - on display at Lake George car show

Among the cars captivating 10,000 people attending the Adirondack Nationals car show in Lake George last weekend were three vehicles customized by Bill Dawley of Connecticut (front to rear): a customized 1937 Ford Coupe dragster, a 1932 Ford Hi-Boy hot rod, and a 1963 Ford Falcon Dawley gave to his daughter Jillian when she was just a youngster.

Among the cars captivating 10,000 people attending the Adirondack Nationals car show in Lake George last weekend were three vehicles customized by Bill Dawley of Connecticut (front to rear): a customized 1937 Ford Coupe dragster, a 1932 Ford Hi-Boy hot rod, and a 1963 Ford Falcon Dawley gave to his daughter Jillian when she was just a youngster. Photo by Thom Randall.

— All the trim was original, down to the gridded aluminum panels that accented it’s towering inclined tail-fins, bullet-shaped rear-view mirrors and chrome refrigerator-style door handles.

It’s owner, Lee Jacobs of Kahnawke, Quebec, watched people admire the car and reminisce about the horror movie.

“Owning this car was a childhood dream of mine,” he said. “And then I found one in San Franciso that I could afford.”

Jacobs bought the vehicle for $25,000 — ten times what it sold for brand new.

Don Scrum, 25, of Nassau NY admired the vehicle’s white and tomato-soup red two-tone paint, and its perfect interior.

“I’ve never seen this model up close — only in the movie,” Scrum said. “They don’t make cars like this anymore.”

Skyler Taylor, 30, rode in the passenger seat when Jacobs drove it down from Quebec to Lake George for the show.

“All the way driving down here, we were turning people’s heads,” Taylor said. “They’d scream ‘Christine, Christine!’ wherever we went.”

About 30 feet away was a customized 1937 Ford two-seater silver coupe with swooping lines that sat less than an inch off the pavement. It’s owner, Bill Dawley of Waterford, Conn. watched dozens of people — curious as to how it could drive on roads with such a radically lowered suspension — snap photographs of it on their cell phones.

“If I had a dollar for every picture taken of this car, I could have retired already,” Dawley said.

The vintage coupe’s swooping narrow windows and graceful lines belied the power under the hood — a 700-horsepower Chevy small block V-8. Dawley admitted it was a modified racer with a quick-change rear end.

Dawley, who owns Dawley’s Collision & Custom Body Shop in Waterford, also brought two other vehicles to the Lake George show: a 1932 Ford Hi-Boy painted fluorescent antifreeze green, and a customized low-rider 1963 Ford Falcon compact convertible powered by a 302 V8. Decades ago, Dawley had presented the classic Falcon as a gift years ago to his daughter Jillian, she recalled as she gazed at its lowered body and custom wheels.

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