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Turning Back the Pages

•100 years ago - Oct. 26, 1913•

Long hike back to town

T. H. Lawrence of New York, who shot and killed his guide, William Schryer of Tupper Lake, while hunting in the Adirondacks on the afternoon of Oct. 17, 1913, will be held for the Grand Jury according to Justice of the Peace Bissell. Mr. Lawrence, when he found he had shot his guide, mistaking him for a deer, ran along the state road through the Adirondack darkness for a distance of 20 miles in order to get a surgeon. He covered the distance between the scene of the accident and the town of Axton in five hours.

Birdshot found its mark

While hunting birds on Oct. 26, 1913, in Alfred Stone’s pasture on Harrington Hill, Warrensburgh, Herbert Scryver of Lewisville was accidentally shot by another hunter who was screened from his view by a heavy fog. Bird shot lodged in various parts of Scryver’s body. The wounds were not serious unless they cause blood poisoning. Later the only shot extracted was the one in his finger.

Scryver was accompanied by Garry Hall, another young man of Warrensburgh. The men made no effort to find the man who fired the shot as they were convinced that it was purely accidental and the hunter was probably unaware that his bullets had found a target. They lost no time at all in getting out of the range of further shots.

Men escape flaming death

Hall & Granger’s five-passenger Maxwell touring car burned on Sunday, Oct. 19, 1913 on the Lamb Hill Road between Warrensburgh and Bolton. The car was going down the hill when it caught fire. It was run to the side of the road and an effort was made to check the flames, but without avail and everything that was combustible about the machine was consumed. The machine was occupied by Mr. Hall and Mr. Granger and the loss is only partly covered by insurance.

Readers are welcome to contact Adirondack Journal correspondent Jean Hadden at jhadden1@nycap.rr.com or 623-2210.

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