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Warrensburg-Lake George Price Chopper to create 100+ jobs, stay open 24 hours

Area officials hail plans for new supermarket, impact on regional economy

Area politicians and Golub Corporation executives gather for a groundbreaking ceremony Oct. 16 for a new supermarket — the first ever of its size and range of services — to be built just south of Warrensburg. Notables participating in the event include Price Chopper Chairman of the Board Neil Golub (third from right), Mona Golub (far left), plus (left to right): Warrensburg Town Supervisor Kevin Geraghty, Lake George Town Supervisor Dennis Dickinson, state Assemblyman Dan Stec, and various Price Chopper officials. At the ceremony, officials predicted the development would have a substantial impact on the regional economy.

Area politicians and Golub Corporation executives gather for a groundbreaking ceremony Oct. 16 for a new supermarket — the first ever of its size and range of services — to be built just south of Warrensburg. Notables participating in the event include Price Chopper Chairman of the Board Neil Golub (third from right), Mona Golub (far left), plus (left to right): Warrensburg Town Supervisor Kevin Geraghty, Lake George Town Supervisor Dennis Dickinson, state Assemblyman Dan Stec, and various Price Chopper officials. At the ceremony, officials predicted the development would have a substantial impact on the regional economy. Photo by Thom Randall.

— Lake George Town Supervisor Dennis Dickinson characterized the new supermarket and its host plaza as “the Seventh Wonder of the lower Adirondacks.”

“It’s something we’ve really needed — and it will be great for the area,” he said.

Officials: supermarket to boost the region

Lake George Regional Chamber of Commerce President Michael Consuelo also offered his thoughts. He said the Price Chopper and its host plaza would provide needed jobs, but also simulate economic development regionally.

“This is a very exciting project not only for Warrensburg and Lake George, but for all of Warren County,” he said.

Barry Feinman of Vanguard-Fine, a developer and owner of various plazas in the Capital Region and Queensbury, praised the local officials for helping move the plans through the regulatory process.

He said it was the most challenging site his firm had ever worked on, considering its bedrock, how it is cut into a hillside and requires retaining walls up to 30 feet high, and features an 80-feet drop in elevation from east to west. Feinman also observed that the site, created by purchasing and combining six different parcels, has a major utility transmission line running through it. Additionally, the development needed a sewer line run partially up Harrington Hill and water brought in underneath state Rte. 9, and required re-engineering of an intersection on the highway.

These challenges didn’t dim his enthusiasm, he said.

“We’re excited about the project,” he said.

Concern about Garage Sale traffic snarls

Golub said he had one big concern about the Warrensburg site, and that was the severe traffic backups occurring over the first weekend in October during the annual World’s Largest Garage Sale.

He said he had contacted the state Police to see how the Garage-Sale traffic snarls — which can back up vehicles for about a mile and cause hour-long delays — could be resolved. Geraghty responded later that he was discussing with the state Department of Transportation the idea of adjusting the timing of traffic signals to lessen the congestion.

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