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Natural born hunters

Notes from the North Woods

The author readies a full plate of all-organic, free range, humanly harvested, sustainable, all natural, wild brook trout for a low impact, high protein meal that will be mixed with venison loins, for a true surf and turf dinner.

The author readies a full plate of all-organic, free range, humanly harvested, sustainable, all natural, wild brook trout for a low impact, high protein meal that will be mixed with venison loins, for a true surf and turf dinner.

Children, who have no models to reveal the behavior, will often use a stick as a spear.

In more developed societies, children will often utilize a stick as a rifle or a bow. There is an ongoing debate over whether this behavior is an instinctive trait or whether it has been learned and modeled.

Although the majority of modern societies have long since abandoned hunting as a means of subsistence, there is no denying the fact that hunting has made us what we are today.

Although many people now believe hunting is an ancient and archaic activity that serves no purpose in modern times, there are many others that continue to recognize hunting as an activity that keeps us in contact with the natural world in a most natural way.

Rather than being complacent observers of nature, hunting allows participants to become part of the process as authentic participants in the wild cycle of the natural world. Hunting permits humans to experience a complete immersion into the natural world. It is an activity that serves to heighten our senses and satisfy an undeniable and indescribable primeval need in our soul.

In the process, we learn to become more intimate with and connected to our natural surroundings. We develop a greater appreciation for the environment, and we strive to protect it.

The process of hunting often requires patience and long hours of waiting in the cold, morning stillness. We learn patience, persistence and resolve.

It also requires an uncanny ability to outwit and deceive a wild creature in its natural environment.

Most of all, hunters must learn how to outwit their prey. Often this is achieved only as a result of careful stalking or the ability to mimic a unique call in order to deceive and attract the prey into range.

Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

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