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Natural born hunters

Notes from the North Woods

The author readies a full plate of all-organic, free range, humanly harvested, sustainable, all natural, wild brook trout for a low impact, high protein meal that will be mixed with venison loins, for a true surf and turf dinner.

The author readies a full plate of all-organic, free range, humanly harvested, sustainable, all natural, wild brook trout for a low impact, high protein meal that will be mixed with venison loins, for a true surf and turf dinner.

There is no denying the fact that human beings are genetically hardwired to hunt. We are instilled with this need by nature, and it is in our composition to be predators.

Our evolutionary tract spans tens of thousands of years, and over this course of time, human beings have evolved to become the planet’s apex predator. Our instinct to hunt exceeds heritage and culture, geography and economy.

With the annual Big Game Hunting Season scheduled to get under way this weekend, with the opening of the muzzleloading season, it may be a good time to look into the future of the sport.

The desire to hunt is in our essence. We are the apex predator on earth. Homosapiens have subsisted by adapting to a life as hunter gatherers for over 95 percent of the time they have been on this planet.

Until our forebears learned how to cultivate crops, domesticate animals and develop agriculture as a means of subsistence about 12,000 years ago, all humans lived this way.

For humans, hunting is a very natural means of existence. As a species, we are motivated by a drive that is difficult to explain and yet impossible to ignore.

In modern times, the majority of humans deny the urge to stalk and hunt, and yet at the same time, many other chose to nurture it.

Although a major portion of modern society has come to rely on agricultural products and farmed food for the majority of their dietary needs, there are still many others who exist partly on a subsistence diet of fish, fowl and game.

Despite the modern achievements and advancements in the food chain, humans remain true hunters.

Studies reveal the propensity of young boys to utilize a stick as a hunting tool, even in societies that no longer have any obvious connections to such hunting traditions.

Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

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