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Officials: Wbg. garage sale draws record one-day crowd

Bargain-hunters browse among vendors’ offerings Saturday Oct. 5 along Main St. in Warrensburg during the town’s famous World’s Largest Garage Sale. Virtually everything from dollar-store items, tools and household goods to valuable antiques and rare collectibles were offered at the event.

Bargain-hunters browse among vendors’ offerings Saturday Oct. 5 along Main St. in Warrensburg during the town’s famous World’s Largest Garage Sale. Virtually everything from dollar-store items, tools and household goods to valuable antiques and rare collectibles were offered at the event. Photo by Thom Randall.

— This year, the crowd numbered 75,000 on Saturday alone, event clean-up coordinator Gary Ross said.

LeCount looked past her small table of books and magazines she was selling, gazing at the crowd.

“This is amazing — I can’t believe how its grown,” LeCount said, noting that companion sales now are held in neighboring Chestertown, Lake George and Bolton. “I’m glad I’m not organizing this sale anymore.”

Walking past LeCount was Michael Leone and his family from Syosset, L.I. — He found antique Lionel train layout items, like shrubs and trees, in their original box. He bought the item for his father, a model train fan.

“This is great,” he said looking at the lineup of vendors. “You can find everything you are looking for in one shot.”

Leone also bought a classic Power Ranger lunchbox and a faux parking meter bank for his son Gabriel, 7.

Reaching up to the meter to insert a nickel, Gabriel demonstrated how it would collect lots of coins in its lengthy post, taller than he was. The family has visited the garage sale since three years before Gabriel was born.

“You put money in like this, and it doesn’t get lost — it’s saved,” Gabriel said. His father responded with a smile.

“Or mommy doesn’t borrow it,” Leone responded.

Local entreprenuers kept busy

Fifty feet away, David O’Neill of Warrensburg was demonstrating one of his coal-fired heating boilers that he said can save more than 60 percent of home heating costs.

“Some people walking by think this is a whiskey still,” he said. Nearby, his wife Linda O’Neill was manning several booths displaying her silver and polished rock and gemstone jewelry. On Saturday, thousands of people examined her inventory which has expanded substantially in the past several years.

“We’re doing great this year,” she said.

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