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Adirondack Wild to host event at Grange

Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve presents its highest honor, the Paul Schaefer Wilderness Award, to Gary Randorf for a lifetime of achievement in protecting and educating the world about the wild Adirondack Park.

Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve presents its highest honor, the Paul Schaefer Wilderness Award, to Gary Randorf for a lifetime of achievement in protecting and educating the world about the wild Adirondack Park.

— Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve presents its highest honor, the Paul Schaefer Wilderness Award, to Gary Randorf for a lifetime of achievement in protecting and educating the world about the wild Adirondack Park.

The award will be presented in absentia to Randorf’s close friends at a ceremony during the organization’s Annual Meeting at The Grange in Whallonsburg on Saturday morning, Oct. 5. Randorf now lives in North Carolina, but used to live in Essex. Following the presentation, Bonnie MacLeod will present a slide show of Gary’s wild land photography, courtesy of the Adirondack Council.

In addition, Adirondack Wild presents its Wild Stewardship Award to Champlain Area Trails (CATS), headquartered in Westport, for that organization’s effectiveness in creating and stewarding trails in the Champlain Valley to link communities and ecosystems. Chris Maron, Executive Director, and Katharine Preston, Board Chair, will accept the award.

John Davis, a resident of Essex and former Conservation Director for the Adirondack Council, former staff for the Foundation for Deep Ecology, former editor of Wild Earth and land manager with the Eddy Foundation will also receive the organization’s Wild Stewardship Award.

Adirondack Wild’s annual meeting and award presentations are free and open to the public. The meeting begins at 10 a.m. on Oct. 5 at The Grange. For reservations and directions to The Grange, visit adirondackwild.org.

Randorf began his career in 1972 as an ecologist with the NYS Adirondack Park Agency and conducted, along with the legendary Clarence Petty, a comprehensive review of Park’s wild, scenic and recreational rivers. He later became executive director of the Adirondack Council, where he led that organization to new heights as a Park advocate. He became a leader in the fight to combat acid rain’s devastating impacts on the Park’s fish, soils and freshwater. Later, Randorf returned to the APA as an educator and interpreter for the new Park Visitor Interpretive Centers.

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