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Area school teachers to go WILD in their classrooms

Shelly Young, center, a teacher at Ticonderoga Elementary School is trained and equipped to teach Project WILD (Wildlife in Learning Design) in her classrooms thanks to a partnership of the Lake George Association and the Lake Champlain-Lake George Regional Planning Board.

Shelly Young, center, a teacher at Ticonderoga Elementary School is trained and equipped to teach Project WILD (Wildlife in Learning Design) in her classrooms thanks to a partnership of the Lake George Association and the Lake Champlain-Lake George Regional Planning Board.

— Teachers from Ticonderoga, Whitehall, Putnam, Fort Ann, Queensbury, Lake George, and Bolton are now trained and equipped to teach Project WILD (Wildlife in Learning Design) in their classrooms thanks to a partnership of the Lake George Association and the Lake Champlain-Lake George Regional Planning Board and a grant from the Lake Champlain Basin Program.

Project WILD is a supplementary, interdisciplinary environmental education program that emphasizes wildlife. The Project WILD program is administered by the Council for Environmental Educators, but in New York, the program is coordinated through the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and funded through Return a Gift to Wildlife donations.

“Project WILD is a great curriculum that helps to foster responsible actions towards wildlife and related natural resources. It leads students from awareness to action by teaching how to think, not what to think, and allows students to evaluate choices, not disregard them,” said Kristen Rohne, the LGA’s education coordinator.

Project WILD facilitators from the LGA and LCLGRPB conducted the Project WILD workshop for teachers. Those who attended the free workshop learned about and received the Project WILD Curriculum and Activity Guide and also received a “treasure chest” filled with all the materials needed to perform the learned activities in their classrooms. The activities focused on topics such as limiting factors that affect animal populations, predator and prey relationships, importance of animal adaptations, and biomagnification of pesticides in food chains.

“The teachers enjoyed the hands-on learning of the workshop and had great conversations with one another on how to incorporate the Project WILD activities into their current lessons. They are excited to use their new materials and activities with their students,” said Beth Gilles, the LCLGRBP’s environmental planner.

The Lake George Association is a member-supported nonprofit organization. Founded in 1885, the Lake George Association is the nation’s oldest lake protection organization. For more information call 668-3558 or visit www.lakegeorgeassociation.org.

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