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A collaboration of voice and winds

The Four Winds Recorder Consort will be teaming up with the Northern Adirondack Vocal Ensemble to perform the show “Madrigals, Motets and Merriment” this weekend in Plattsburgh and Saranac Lake. From left are Lynn Waickman of Saranac Lake, Véronique Tétreault of Montreal, Christopher Barry of Rouses Point and Anne Paulson of Bloomingdale.

The Four Winds Recorder Consort will be teaming up with the Northern Adirondack Vocal Ensemble to perform the show “Madrigals, Motets and Merriment” this weekend in Plattsburgh and Saranac Lake. From left are Lynn Waickman of Saranac Lake, Véronique Tétreault of Montreal, Christopher Barry of Rouses Point and Anne Paulson of Bloomingdale.

— Forget what you remember about recorders from elementary school.

With the right kind of conductor and the right kind of musicians—and a variety of instruments from the recorder family—the sound is majestic enough to make angels sing.

If you go:

What: The Northern Adirondack Vocal Ensemble and the Four Winds Recorder Consort

When: Saturday, June 1 and Sunday, June 2 at 7:30 p.m.

Where: Saturday: St. Peter’s Church, 114 Cornelia St., Plattsburgh

Sunday: St. Bernard’s Church, 27 St. Bernard St., Saranac Lake

Cost: $10 suggested donation.

Or, at the very least, it’s majestic enough to accompany the Northern Adirondack Vocal Ensemble (NAVE) for a series of two performances in Plattsburgh and Saranac Lake.

On Saturday and Sunday, NAVE will team up with the Four Winds Recorder Consort to perform two performances of “Madrigals, Motets and Merriment.”

The show draws its inspiration from the Renaissance Period, 1400–1600, when recorders and choirs were all the rage.

“Madrigals were often written for aristocrats, and motets were often commissioned by the churches,” said Hill and Hollow Director Angela Brown. “There are thousands of them to choose from.”

Churches are Brown’s favorite venue to perform in because of the way sounds resonate throughout the structure.

“The Renaissance Period was a period of great creativity,” Brown said. “A lot of beautiful music was written during that time. It was conceived for listening to in these beautiful spaces.”

According to Brown, recorders fit that standard quite nicely.

The instrument comes in many shapes and sizes, which cover a range of pitches, listed from high to low: sopranino, soprano, alto, tenor, bass, contra bass and great bass.

Players in the Four Winds will rotate between the different recorders, creating music Wood described as “dulcet tones that are soft and lovely.”

At the helm of “Madrigals, Motets, and Merriment” is conductor Andrew Benware.

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