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A day of tastings for a cause

Richard Lamoy, owner of Hid-In-Pines Vineyard in Morrisonville, is hosting the second annual Wine, Cheese and Chocolate Fundraiser to benefit the Treasure Chests Relay for Life Team on Saturday, June 1.

Richard Lamoy, owner of Hid-In-Pines Vineyard in Morrisonville, is hosting the second annual Wine, Cheese and Chocolate Fundraiser to benefit the Treasure Chests Relay for Life Team on Saturday, June 1. Photo by Shaun Kittle.

Lamoy has received five treatments to date and is hoping to schedule his sixth treatment a day or two after the event.

Lamoy’s life-changing diagnosis has brought him difficulties, but there is some good news—a recent positron emission tomography scan showed that the treatments are working.

The imaging test utilizes a radioactive dye, called a tracer, to detect cancer.

When the scan is performed, areas affected by cancer light up and look a lot like a satellite image of light pollution.

Less light is better, and that’s exactly what the results of Lamoy’s scan showed.

“A lot of people are afraid to learn they have cancer,” Lamoy said. “But the sooner you are diagnosed, the sooner you can begin treatment and start fighting it.”

Anne Lautenschuetz, organizer of the Wine, Cheese and Chocolate Fundraiser and captain of the Treasure Chests Relay for Life Team, can relate.

On her 30th birthday, she received some troubling news.

“I am a 17-year survivor of breast cancer,” Lautenschuetz said. “I was 30 years old and pregnant with my second son while diagnosed, so I went through surgery and chemo while I was still pregnant.”

Almost two decades later, Lamoy is still actively attending support groups to give hope to others who have been diagnosed with cancer.

“When I was going through my cancer, I had a lot of really strong family and friends support,” Lautenschuetz said. “I didn’t think I needed to go to a support group, and I thought it would be like what you see on T.V., a lot of depressed old ladies sitting around crying, and I didn’t need that.”

About two years after her diagnosis, the nurse oncologist at the Fitzpatrick Cancer Center in Plattsburgh called Lautenschuetz and asked her to take part in a program called Reach to Recovery, which matches up someone who has been through cancer with someone who has recently been diagnosed.

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