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A day of tastings for a cause

Richard Lamoy, owner of Hid-In-Pines Vineyard in Morrisonville, is hosting the second annual Wine, Cheese and Chocolate Fundraiser to benefit the Treasure Chests Relay for Life Team on Saturday, June 1.

Richard Lamoy, owner of Hid-In-Pines Vineyard in Morrisonville, is hosting the second annual Wine, Cheese and Chocolate Fundraiser to benefit the Treasure Chests Relay for Life Team on Saturday, June 1. Photo by Shaun Kittle.

MORRISONVILLE — Last year, Richard Lamoy, owner of Hid-In-Pines Vineyard, let the Treasure Chests Relay for Life Team hold a fundraiser at his vineyard to raise money for the American Cancer Society.

There was music, food and plenty of wine tastings to be had at the all-day event, called the Wine, Cheese and Chocolate Fundraiser.

The fundraiser will return, bigger and better, on Saturday, June 1, but for Lamoy the event is a little more personal this year.

At the end of 2012, he went to the doctor to have a cat scan for a kidney stone, a fairly routine, if not discomforting, process.

If you go:

What: Wine, Cheese and Chocolate Fundraiser to benefit the Treasure Chests Relay for Life Team

Where: Hid-In-Pines Vineyard, 456 Soper St., Morrisonville

When: Saturday, June 1, from 12:30–7:30 p.m.

Cost: $10 for all tastings. Fee includes a wine glass and handmade wine charm.

Evidence of lymphoma was found so his doctor referred him to a specialist, and after a few months and several tests, Lamoy learned he had stage three follicular lymphoma.

“I was already going to let them do the second benefit, but now it has even more meaning for me. It’s hit home,” Lamoy said. “I never thought I’d say this, but that kidney stone probably helped prolong my life.”

A lot of symptoms of cancer can be attributed to other problems, like the flu, so many cancers aren’t diagnosed until they reach their later stages.

Since lymphomas are particularly slow growing, they almost always remain undetected until they reach stage three or four.

There is no known cure for them, but treatment is available.

“The best they can do is keep it at bay,” Lamoy said. It’s very tiring. The drugs they give you wreak havoc on your entire body.”

Keeping lymphoma at bay means Lamoy must undergo a series of drug treatments, which often leave him feeling nauseous, fatigued and uneasy for a week.

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