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Lake George hearing slated in Ticonderoga

Proposed boating regulations to be discussed June 12

Area residents will have an opportunity to comment on proposed Lake George boating regulations aimed at preventing the spread of invasive species. The Lake George Park Commission will hold a public hearing on the proposed plan Wednesday, June 12, at 6 p.m. at the Best Western in Ticonderoga.

Area residents will have an opportunity to comment on proposed Lake George boating regulations aimed at preventing the spread of invasive species. The Lake George Park Commission will hold a public hearing on the proposed plan Wednesday, June 12, at 6 p.m. at the Best Western in Ticonderoga.

— Area residents will have an opportunity to comment on proposed Lake George boating regulations aimed at preventing the spread of invasive species.

The Lake George Park Commission will hold a public hearing on the proposed plan Wednesday, June 12, at 6 p.m. at the Best Western in Ticonderoga.

“This has been a very open and significant effort over the past 18 months, and we look forward to the public’s comments on our draft plan” LGPC Chairman Bruce Young said. “These public hearings offer great opportunities for everyone to voice their opinion on this important topic, and these hearings will help shape the commission’s decisions on how to proceed forward.”

The Lake George Park Commission adopted a Draft Invasive Species Prevention Plan and Environmental Impact Statement April 23. The plan identifies a “preferred alternative” that calls for a mandatory inspection program for all trailered boats entering Lake George and hot water power washing decontamination of boats that don’t pass inspection.

Before the draft can become final the public will have 60 days to comment. The public comment period will end June 25. The plan can be read online at the LGPC website, www.lgpc.state.ny.us.

Lake George currently has five invasive species in its waters — asian clam, eurasian milfoil, zebra mussels, curlyleaf pondweed and spiny waterflea. It’s believed those non-native species were brought to Lake George by boats that had been in other lakes.

The LGPC spends more than $1 million a year to manage and eradicate invasive species. In the past two years alone the state and local governments have spent more than $1.5 million in efforts to eradicate the asian clam.

The plan is the result of two years of research and more than 50 public meetings.

According to the draft plan, five inspection and decontamination stations will be set up on Lake George — at Mossy Point in Ticonderoga, Rogers Rock Campsite in Hague, Narowal Marina in Bolton, near Exit 21 of the Northway in Lake George and Ridge Road in Queensbsury. There are 103 boat access points on the lake. Private boat launches and marinas will be asked to sign a memorandum of understanding, agreeing to inspect and decontaminate boats.

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