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'Dial-up’ Internet an endangered species in Thurman

'White space’ access tests conducted

Workers for Rainmaker Network Services install a receiver on a Thurman home as a part of a test effort preceding design of a network of 'white space' transmitters though town to bring reliable high-speed Internet access to the rural, hilly town. Thurman Supervisor Evelyn Wood has estimated that 80 to 90 Thurman homes could have 'white space' Internet access before fall 2014 — completing the first phase of an ongoing project to bring broadband to virtually the entire town.

Workers for Rainmaker Network Services install a receiver on a Thurman home as a part of a test effort preceding design of a network of 'white space' transmitters though town to bring reliable high-speed Internet access to the rural, hilly town. Thurman Supervisor Evelyn Wood has estimated that 80 to 90 Thurman homes could have 'white space' Internet access before fall 2014 — completing the first phase of an ongoing project to bring broadband to virtually the entire town.

— Thurman’s white-space broadband project has been recognized nationally, as it is a pilot project for a very promising technology that is expected to change a lot of lives in rural areas of our nation.

The Thurman white-space project, spearheaded by Evelyn Wood at the initial suggestion of Ava Ashendorff of Chestertown, has been described on National Public Radio, written up in the Senate Rural Resources magazine, and described on PBS television.

Supervisor Wood, who applied for and obtained a $200,000 grant for the white space broadband access project, was interviewed recently for the Capitol Press Room radio show, broadcast statewide.

(Adirondack Journal Editor Thom Randall contributed to this report.)

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