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A year’s worth of weather, in a week

Notes from the North Woods

The still waters of an Adirondack pond can be transformed into frothing waves and pounding surf within a moment’s notice. Extremes of weather often complement the extreme beauty of this land.

The still waters of an Adirondack pond can be transformed into frothing waves and pounding surf within a moment’s notice. Extremes of weather often complement the extreme beauty of this land.

After putting up with models, props, locations, stylists and more than a few unhappy hair dressers, I couldn’t wait to get back on the water for a few days of fishing.

Even though I had to deal with hordes of savage black flies, raging winds, driving snow, thick fog, and gale force winds that pelted us with sleet and hail, it was great to be on the water again.

Over the weekend, I set off with an old guest on Lake Placid in a search for lake trout, and we managed to find a few cooperative specimens. However, with water temperatures hovering around 58 degrees, the lakers were rather disagreeable, and we only managed to pull one in the boat, before gently releasing it.

However, our luck soon changed after we retreated to a small, stream where the brookies were anxious to feed. They attacked just about anything we tossed their way, and we tossed a lot of flies.

The weekend of angling adventures was finally complete after we spent a few hours flycasting cork poppers to big bass that were cruising the shallow shorelines of a small, private lake.

The largemouth proved to be voracious, healthy and just itching for a fight. I think they would’ve hit an old boot, if we could have figured a way to tie it one on!

On the return trip back to the lodge, we stumbled upon a small tributary stream that was chuck full of large pods of marsh marigolds.

The striking yellow flowers, with green leaves stood in stark contrast with the black waters of the tiny stream. Nearby, we found fiddlehead ferns that were as yet unfurled, and specimens of both painted and purple trilliums.

Wildflowers, wild weather and wild fish, what more can be a finer find for on a spring day in the Park?

Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

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