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Truth or consequences

Thoughts from Behind the Pressline

Back in the 1950s, “Truth or Consequences” was a popular television show where contestants received roughly two seconds to answer a trivia question correctly before “Beulah the Buzzer” sounded. If the contestant could not complete the “Truth” portion, there would be “Consequences,” usually a zany and embarrassing stunt.

There is nothing zany or trivial about the government’s handling of last year’s events in Benghazi where four Americans, including our Libyan Ambassador Christopher Stevens, were killed. The truth regarding the events, before, during and after must be addressed in a truthful and straight forward manner and not filtered from either political bias. I truly wonder if that is even possible in America any longer.

We must put politics aside. We know our politicians on both sides of the aisle can’t help themselves when it comes to spinning the truth. Especially when there is an election at stake or an opportunity to pile on the opposition, but neither of those motives should be the point for demanding the truth behind the events in Benghazi. As Americans we deserve to know what went wrong. We deserve truthful answers because it does matter what we are told by our government.

We are a nation built on certain values: Home of the brave, land of the free where truth, fairness and justice are at the core of our creation and existence. From the beginning of the events on Sept. 11, 2012 it seemed odd that the information coming out concerning the attack on the embassy wasn’t making much sense.

All the talk about some small production YouTube video and a demonstration that somehow turned violent with rocket launching grenades and serious firepower and no military response to secure our personnel or the scene just wasn’t adding up. Days after the attack reporters and locals were walking through the former consulate but the FBI would not arrive on the scene to investigate for more than two weeks.

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