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All things maple celebrated in North Country

"Peter Johnpeer harkened back even further with the maple boiling tech, demonstrating how Native Americans would use a carved out tree and red-hot rocks to boil the sap not only into syrup, but also into maple rock candy."

"Peter Johnpeer harkened back even further with the maple boiling tech, demonstrating how Native Americans would use a carved out tree and red-hot rocks to boil the sap not only into syrup, but also into maple rock candy." Photo by Keith Lobdell.

— Smoke billowed from the sugarhouse on the 1812 Homestead March 23 as locals and tourists got a chance to see how maple syrup was made in the 19th century.

The homestead hosted its annual Maple Sugar event, part of New York State’s annual Maple Weekends, which are held the last two weekends in March to promote the business of producing syrup.

In the sugarhouse, people were able to see how sap from maple trees was boiled down before the days of reverse-osmosis and tubing, even getting the chance to collect sap from tap buckets.

In the homestead’s candle cabin, Peter Johnpeer harkened back even further with the maple boiling tech, demonstrating how Native Americans would use a carved out tree and red-hot rocks to boil the sap not only into syrup, but also into maple rock candy.

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