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Warren County hailed on its 200th anniversary

In a ceremony held Friday March 15, Essex County Board of Supervisors Chairman Randy Douglas (right) presents a proclamation commemorating  Warren County’s bicentennial to county Board of Supervisors Chairman Kevin Geraghty. 
Photo by Thom Randall

In a ceremony held Friday March 15, Essex County Board of Supervisors Chairman Randy Douglas (right) presents a proclamation commemorating Warren County’s bicentennial to county Board of Supervisors Chairman Kevin Geraghty. Photo by Thom Randall Photo by Thom Randall.

— Warren County passed a historic milestone last week, and area government officials reached out to commemorate the occasion.

March 12 was the 200th anniversary of Warren County’s founding, and local town leaders, as well as a top Essex County official — plus aides to Gov. Andrew Cuomo and U.S. Rep. Bill Owens — all presented proclamations of congratulations Friday March 15 to the Warren County Board of Supervisors at their monthly meeting.

Also, state Assemblyman Dan Stec presented a proclamation on behalf of both the state Senate and state Assembly.

Randy Douglas, chairman of the Essex County Board of Supervisors, read a proclamation authored by his county. He noted that he personally had a deep bond with Warren County.

“My favorite place in the whole nation is Lake George,” he said. “It holds fond memories for me.”

Later, Douglas said Essex county also enjoyed a strong bond with its southern neighbor.

“Sharing a lot of the same concerns, Essex and Warren counties enjoy an excellent working relationship,” he said.

The leaders of Warren County’s 11 towns were each introduced, and they presented proclamations, one by one, to Board of Supervisors Chairman Kevin Geraghty.

Johnsburg Supervisor Ron Vanselow read a proclamation he wrote, noting the county’s cultural and educational attractions and its innovative businesses.

Thurman Supervisor Evelyn Wood read a proclamation she authored — it noted the county’s growth over the years, “balancing progress and modernization while cherishing and preserving its natural beauty and heritage.”

Stony Creek Supervisor Frank Thomas read his town’s proclamation, noting the county’s wealth of natural resources, including “abundant water power and vast valuable forests, securing a livelihood and a ready return for labor working at the numerous mills and tanneries that flourished.”

He also commemorated the county’s growth “from 9,000 sturdy souls in 1820 to 66,000 in 2013.”

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