Quantcast

Ancient anglers

Notes from the North Woods

Last spring, a vast majority of the local lakes and ponds were devoid of ice by the April 1 trout season opener. Many anglers are hoping for a similar early start this spring.

Last spring, a vast majority of the local lakes and ponds were devoid of ice by the April 1 trout season opener. Many anglers are hoping for a similar early start this spring.

“The projectiles blew us away with finely knapped flint-knapped points" claimed one team member ,”Such tools have only been found at more recent sites,” The barbed points were markedly different from those previously found at Clovis sites, which tend to be simple, fluted points. This discovery hints at the coexistence of two separate groups of people in North America at the time.

The discovery may provide evidence that there were actually two native cultures in North America at the time, one of which may have been a seafaring nation that arrived in North America via the oceans, and the other arriving via a land bridge that some scientists believe connected North America to Siberia.

And while it is still far too soon to know for sure, the fact that there were seafaring anglers plying the waters and casting lines nearly 12,000 to 13,000 years ago should give hope to most Adirondack anglers, who may only have to wait a few weeks to get back on the waters.

I often wonder what the archeologists will uncover when they discover the 'midden mounds' surrounding the leantos of the Adirondacks. I'm always amazed to find an old Utica Club or Schlitz beer bottle under a leanto floor, and I can only guess how many similar bottles are buried in the nearby lake bottoms.

Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment