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Ahhh…summertime, and the livin’ is easy

Notes from the North Woods

Ribbons of fog often cap the summit of Whiteface Mountain during the early morning hours.  The sight offers a reminder of what’s to come as the summer season segways towards autumn.  The Adirondack summer has always been a dwarf on the annual calendar.

Ribbons of fog often cap the summit of Whiteface Mountain during the early morning hours. The sight offers a reminder of what’s to come as the summer season segways towards autumn. The Adirondack summer has always been a dwarf on the annual calendar.

The rivers have remained quite high this season, and their waters have been rather cool. However, lake temperatures are now comparable to bathwater and the rope swings have been busy.

The night skies have remained as brilliant as I can ever recall, and the morning’s fog equally as thick. The recent cool nights have offered up numerous examples of nature’s extraordinary ribbony masterpieces, which have been as fascinating to view from the valleys as from the mountaintops.

Such scenes are always compounded by the appearance of a full moon, a brilliant sunset or other natural attractions.

Although autumn will always remain my favored season for a number of good reasons, summer chases right along in a hard second.

It is a youthful season, and one of the most fleeting available in our little neck of the woods. Although it brings with it a myriad of inconveniences which include muggy heat, rain, bugs, clogged roads and busy streets; the summer always serves to brings back our youth. And I wouldn’t trade that for all the Bluebird days of autumn, winter or spring combined.

Where have the butterflies gone?

For me, one of the surest signs of the summer season has always been the preponderance of butterflies in our backyard, which is overgrown with a thick swath of milkweed plants.

To date, I have not witnessed a single monarch in the air or on the plants. Nor have I seen a single yellow swallowtail butterfly, sipping water along the edge of any stream, brook, creek, river or seep.

Often, while wading the Boquet over the years, it has become quite common to encounter a rabble of swallowtails gathered along a wet riverbank. It is always a joy to witness a rabble take to the air, and float along gently on the air currents of a river corridor.

Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

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