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Ahhh…summertime, and the livin’ is easy

Notes from the North Woods

Ribbons of fog often cap the summit of Whiteface Mountain during the early morning hours.  The sight offers a reminder of what’s to come as the summer season segways towards autumn.  The Adirondack summer has always been a dwarf on the annual calendar.

Ribbons of fog often cap the summit of Whiteface Mountain during the early morning hours. The sight offers a reminder of what’s to come as the summer season segways towards autumn. The Adirondack summer has always been a dwarf on the annual calendar.

As I grow older, it seems the summer season has become much more fleeting than it was in my younger days, when the prospect of returning to a classroom was a constant lingering threat.

While I understand the rationale behind the concept that a person’s perception of time is altered as they age — It is an odd fact that while some summer days appear to last forever; the weeks and months seem to move faster than a dollar sign at the gas pump.

The inescapable truth is the duration of our days is extended as a result of the quantity of activities we manage to pack into them. A long day may include a morning hike, some swimming, some diving, a lazy canoe float and a bit of casting even if the fish don’t want to cooperate.

But when the fish do decide to provide a bit of entertainment, time stops for a while; or it can even allow one to regress. I’ve known many men, and ladies for that matter, who are reduced to the state of giddy, little kids at the mere shadow of a trout approaching their fly.

This pattern of activity based regression is in fact the definition of recreation, which when broken down is simply to recreate, our spirit, our enthusiasm, and our reasons for living.

Some folks have a need to achieve in order to get their dose of recreation, of which the recent Ironman USA is a classic example. Run, bike, and swim is fine for some, while many others prefer to drink, grill and snooze. To each his own, sport.

I’ve also noticed the lack of time I’ve spent in camp this summer has had a drastic effect on my understanding of the season.

There have been far fewer nights spent around the fire, watching the sparks intermingle with a million stars overhead, as fireflies continue to blink and flicker off and on in the pitch blackness.

Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

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