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Ticonderoga pencil anniversary to be marked

Ti Stamp Club, Heritage Museum plan July 23 event

The Dixon Ticonderoga pencil is 100 this year.  To commemorate this event, the Ticonderoga Heritage Museum and the Ticonderoga Stamp Club will hold a stamp cancellation on Tuesday, July 23, at the Heritage Museum 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.  For the price of a postage stamp collectors can get a one-of-a-kind souvenir.  A special cachet and post card set will also be available.

The Dixon Ticonderoga pencil is 100 this year. To commemorate this event, the Ticonderoga Heritage Museum and the Ticonderoga Stamp Club will hold a stamp cancellation on Tuesday, July 23, at the Heritage Museum 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. For the price of a postage stamp collectors can get a one-of-a-kind souvenir. A special cachet and post card set will also be available.

— If you’ve ever used a pencil — And who hasn’t? — you’ve almost certainly used a Dixon Ticonderoga.

The brand, famous worldwide, is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year. To mark the occasion, the Ticonderoga Stamp Club and Ticonderoga Heritage Museum will host a special event Tuesday, July 23.

That’s when a special postal cachet and post card set, designed by artists Stan Burdick of Ticonderoga and Kama Ingleston of Crown Point, will be sold to the public 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the museum.

There will also be discussions of stamps and stamp collecting as well as tours of the museum.

“It’s going to be a good day,” said Burdick, president of Ticonderoga Stamp Club. “We hope a lot of people will stop by and see the new cachet and see the museum.”

This is the second postal cachet designed by the Ti Stamp Club. The first, depicting the Lake Champlain Bridge opening, sold 200 sets. That cachet will also be on sale July 23.

“Stamp enthusiasts are great collectors,” Burdick said. “We had people from all over the country buy our first venture (the bridge cachet).”

Joseph Dixon, who grew up in Massachusetts in the early 1800s, had long dreamed of manufacturing affordable pencils. When the Civil War began there was suddenly a demand for pencils as soldiers and their families sought to stay in touch. Dixon invented a wood planing machine that churned out 132 pencils a minute, enabling him to create four-inch long, cedar pencils. With the technology now available to make the wooden pencils, the difficult part became finding graphite.

Following Dixon’s death, his son-in-law took over his company and in 1873 purchased Ticonderoga’s American Graphite Company. That deal led to the creation of Dixon Ticonderoga in 1913. By 1954 it’s believed 75 percent of the world’s pencils were Dixon Ticonderoga.

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