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The Joys of an Adirondack Summer

Notes from the North Woods

Summer adventure:  Guess who’s coming to dinner?

Summer adventure: Guess who’s coming to dinner?

Our parents called it the boob tube. I guess it was really just a predecessor to the You tube, but far less risky.

Today’s children are simply not getting outside. They are not fishing, building forts in the woods, catching frogs or turning over logs for salamanders. In short, children are living nature-deprived childhood’s that are responsible for a serious disconnect from the real world of birds, bees, trees and all the entertainment they can provide.

Children who grow up primarily indoors are deprived from developing a full connection to nature. Tethered by technology and over structured with schedules that would make an executive flinch, many of today’s children are missing out on the chance to be active participants in the world as a whole.

In many cases, a lack of direct experience in the outdoors has resulted in children connecting nature with fear and disaster, rather than with discovery, joy and wonder.

Fitness is another grave concern, especially when children don’t get the chance to exercise regularly, to run and jump, bike or play games such as Hide ‘n Seek or Capture the Flag

Sadly, researchers predict that the current generation of Americans will be the first generation since the Civil War to have a shorter life expectancy than their parents.

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Gov. Cuomo laughs as attempts to release a small bass, while enjoying a recent fishing outing on the Lower Sarnac Lake. He visited the area to announce New York’s Annual Free Fishing Days.

Kick ‘em out the door!

Richard Louv, author of Last Child in the Woods, explained, “Time in nature is not leisure time; it’s an essential investment in our children’s health.”

The answer? Richard Louv, author of Last Child in the Woods, explained, “Time in nature is not leisure time; it’s an essential investment in our children’s health.”

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends pediatricians promote free, unstructured play and discourage excessive passive entertainment such as TV, Internet and video games.

It is expected that these guidelines can improve children’s cardio-respiratory fitness, cardiovascular and metabolic health, bone health and body composition.

Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

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