Quantcast

Despite closure talk, Thurman EMS is still responding to calls

Squad to host meeting to hear ideas, gain support

Checking their ambulance’s inventory of supplies and equipment Tuesday Feb. 5 are Thurman EMS volunteers (clockwise, from left): Becky Desourdy, Acting Thurman EMS Captain Josh Hayes, Ernie Smith and squad treasurer Debbie Runyon.

Checking their ambulance’s inventory of supplies and equipment Tuesday Feb. 5 are Thurman EMS volunteers (clockwise, from left): Becky Desourdy, Acting Thurman EMS Captain Josh Hayes, Ernie Smith and squad treasurer Debbie Runyon. Photo by Thom Randall.

— Hayes said that media reports last week implying that public safety had been compromised were erroneous.

“This has all been ridiculous,” he said. “Politics shouldn’t surpass patient care, which is number one with us.”

Area emergency officials have observed that it is difficult for rural squads with limited number of calls to survive, considering the ever-increasing costs and requirements of training and equipment as well as the shrinking availability of volunteers.

Hayes also expressed appreciation to fellow Thurman EMS volunteers John O'Neill, Ernie Smith, Jim and Becky Desourdy, Mike Swanson and Debbie Runyon for manning the station or being on-call to protect public safety.

Squad president Jean Coulard said she was hoping that the town board and the public would understand the gravity of the financial situation and respond with appropriate support to keep the Thurman squad in operation.

“So far, we’ve been fortunate to have dedicated volunteers to respond to calls and we haven’t missed one,” she said. “We’re keeping our fingers crossed and hope things work out with the finances so we can stay operating.”

1
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment