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Gathering in Wbg. to share ideas for boosting local commerce, quality of life

Performing at the recent Adirondack Bucks Pot Luck & Christmas Market are (left to right): Bill Campbell on vocals and guitar, his son Liam (right) on flute, plus (not shown): Everett Ramos on bongos and Lnda Moores on vocals.

Performing at the recent Adirondack Bucks Pot Luck & Christmas Market are (left to right): Bill Campbell on vocals and guitar, his son Liam (right) on flute, plus (not shown): Everett Ramos on bongos and Lnda Moores on vocals. Photo by Thom Randall.

— Several dozen people gathered recently to share ideas related to sustainable living and boosting the local economy, as the Adirondack Cooperative Economy held its second annual Christmas Market.

Several dozen people enjoyed homegrown music, home-prepared foods, as well as socializing.

A number of vendors displayed handcrafted goods which people bought using Adirondack Bucks, a local currency intended to prompt people to buy local.

On Dec. 27, event organizer Anna Busser reflected on the ongoing effort to bring together people who seek to build social connections and meaningful local employment in northern Warren County. This budding movement also shuns materialism and seeks to build local trade to minimize ecological degradation.

“Through our get-togethers and use of Adirondack Bucks, we’re starting a conversation; we’re getting people to question and network,” she said. “People are now brainstorming about how to improve life in local communities.”

Among those attending the Dec. 5 Adirondack Bucks Pot Luck & Christmas Market were Dave and Brenda DeLozier of Saratoga Springs. Dave was once the publisher of EcoLocal Magazine. The two of them grow food in the front yard of their quarter-acre residential property. They brought along a gourmet fermented foods they had prepared, including kimchi and distinctive varieties of sauerkraut — all to share.

Dave Delozier said he supported the Adirondack Cooperative Economy’s mission for local residents to buy from each other, because it created meaningful and prosperous employment for people as well as providing uplifting social connections.

“As soon as you swipe your debit card, the money disappears from your community,” he warned.

The big-box stores provide low-wage jobs that stifle one’s spirit, he continued.

“The corporations keep people barely over broke, and with jobs like that, you can’t grow a community.”

Brenda DeLozier said the use of Adirondack Bucks achieves the objectives of promoting a sustainable economy.

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