Quantcast

‘Tabletop Cooking’ about more than a good meal

Justin (foreground) and John help prepare a salad at the North Country Center for Independence conference room, which twice a week is transformed into a dining and meeting room for clients, care-givers and staff.

Justin (foreground) and John help prepare a salad at the North Country Center for Independence conference room, which twice a week is transformed into a dining and meeting room for clients, care-givers and staff. Photo by Shawn Ryan.

— At the North Country Center for Independence, clients gather twice a week to learn methods of adaptive cooking for the handicapped, but it’s about much more than that.

Adaptive cooking is about encouraging people with disabilities to not just eat out of a can or a microwave. That was the idea behind “Tabletop Cooking” when Michael Sherman, Peer Counselor Coordinator at the NCCI conceived of the program. Sherman said he saw over and over where people with disabilities were eating only high sodium, high fat meals, and their diet exasperated other medical conditions. Tabletop Cooking serves nutritious, mostly fresh food meals.

At each lunch the group serves between 10 and 20 people counting clients and caregivers, for $25 or less each meal. One lunch they prepared fed 20 people for $15. There is a Tuesday group, and a different Thursday group.

But more than just learning to cook a simple lunch, or make a nutritious salad, Tabletop Cooking teaches clients some of the softer skills, like proper socializing and hygiene.

“Socialization is huge among the disabled population,” says Sherman. “It brings them to a comfort zone in their lives.”

One client, Sherman recalled, barely spoke until he got involved in Tabletop Cooking. Now he takes part in lunchtime conversations ranging from sports to Christmas decorations.

“It’s all about socializing and eating, and it’s good food. Sometimes it’s like there are 10 conversations going on at once,” says Shelly Pelkey, a caregiver with the Regional Center for Independent Living, which takes part in Tabletop Cooking.

NCCI staff and friends contributed recipes, and they published an adaptive cookbook to help their clients in cooking at home.

Sherman, who is a peer counsellor for people with disabilities, thinks that while a disability may slow a person down, it doesn’t mean that they can’t enjoy life.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment