Quantcast

Crowd turns out for fundraiser held by local boy stricken with rare extreme-pain disorder

Checking donors in at the Cut-A-Thon for RSD Dec. 7 in Warrensburg are (left to right): John Riley, Dylan Nicholson and Timothy Lucid, who is a North Warren student stricken with Reflex Sympathetic Disorder, an autoimmune condition that causes episodes of extreme, nearly unbearable pain.

Checking donors in at the Cut-A-Thon for RSD Dec. 7 in Warrensburg are (left to right): John Riley, Dylan Nicholson and Timothy Lucid, who is a North Warren student stricken with Reflex Sympathetic Disorder, an autoimmune condition that causes episodes of extreme, nearly unbearable pain. Photo by Thom Randall.

— Last week, Timothy said he was motivated to launch this fundraiser to help others with the condition, as well as raise awareness about its devastation.

“I’m not alone in this disease — there are 50,000 new cases diagnosed each year, and these other people need as much help as I do.”

He said many of those stricken with RSD are children.

“Kids as well as adults need to get help so they can get on with their lives.”

Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy causes burning, electric-shock-type pain to the arm or leg, extreme swelling and possible loss of use of a limb or more if not caught in time.

The intermittent pain can be so intense that it often causes blackouts or temporary paralysis. There is no cure, only the possibility of remission.

Kerry Lucid, a beautician at Heidi’s, was busy with haircuts until about 5:30 p.m., 90 minutes past the time the fundraiser was to be concluded. Also cutting hair were salon staff members Jade Leonbruno, Courtney Beadnell, and Sarah Tyrell. Proprietor Heidi Baker was out of town for the weekend.

Kerry Lucid said she was thrilled with the participation from people across the region, and there was a lot of excitement in the salon for nearly 8 hours.

photo

During the recent Cut-A-Thon for RSD, beautician Courtney Beadnell trims the hair of Kylee Granger of Potterville, Beadnell said she was glad to boost the worthy cause by donating her skills. Granger, a North Warren student known for participating in charities, said she was glad to help out the fundraiser launched by schoolmate Tim Lucid.

“It was amazing that in the short time we spent planning the fundraiser that we got the support we did,” she said. “Times are hard, and for so many people to support a cause for a syndrome that they probably never heard of is really unbelievable.”

Fred Griffen III and his wife Sara Griffen of Pottersville brought their children Fred IV, 10 and Abigail, 11 to the Cut-A-Thon.

“Tim’s a great kid, very well liked in the community, and we’re happy to help as much as we can,” Sara Griffen said.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

KevinG 4 months ago

I wish young Timothy the best and hope he recovers quickly. As a long-term victim of this condition I can speak to the horrific nature of the pain associated with it. I was a Doctor of Chiropractic when a concussion from car accident induced the condition and ended my career. Over the last 15 years, I have learned a great deal about the disease and sadly, I must admit that this was information that I did not acquire in school ... unfortunately, this is also the case for many medical schools. The condition is not as rare as it may first seem, but a large number of victims go into spontaneous remission, often before a diagnosis is made and a second population will see remission after 6-24 months of intensive physical therapy and the use of a very wide range of drug therapies. While it is true that at present there is no cure, there is a great deal of work being done on many promising medications.

To Timothy and his parents, I would like to say, "Do not give up hope!". The story didn't say how long Tim has suffered with this condition, but by now, through information provided on the RSDS website, you should be aware that there is still hope for a spontaneous, or therapy assisted remission, especially if his injury was within the last 12-24 months, as mentioned above. If it has been longer though, know that those times are not written in stone; there are many remissions that take place even years after CRPS rears its ugly head, but that range is when the greatest number of remissions are seen.

Tim, you have a great deal of work and, unfortunately, pain in front of you ... but, you are young and an athlete and those are both in your favor (athletes know about hard work and pain!). To Mrs. Lucid I can only say stay strong for him and be his advocate, make sure the doctors and therapists are pushing him hard and doing all the research they need to do to get him the very best forms of therapy ... there is, as I said, much to hope for. I would also recommend looking into the many groups that help support and supply information for those with the disease and those who support them.

I'm sorry when I hear of any youngster struck with CRPS, but this story presents a nearly ideal situation if it has to happen ... a family, friends, and community all working to support a good, hard working kid who has a terrible, painful disease, one which, unfortunately, is all too often misdiagnosed, undiagnosed, or disbelieved ... I applaud the paper for telling his story, and all of Tim's supporters for their efforts and caring. Best of luck Tim.

0

Sign in to comment