Quantcast

Warrensburg schools' new CEO aims to boost programs, seek grants

New Warrensburg Central Superintendent of Schools John Goralski talks about his initial impressions of the local public school system — and his objectives for its future — in an interview Dec. 9.

New Warrensburg Central Superintendent of Schools John Goralski talks about his initial impressions of the local public school system — and his objectives for its future — in an interview Dec. 9. Photo by Thom Randall.

— “The success the school system has experienced in tough economic times is a testament not only to the staff, but the support the school received from people in the community,” he said.

Goralski has pursued various careers over the last 30 years. He graduated from SUNY Plattsburgh in 1983 with a degree in Environmental Science and Planning, and took a job as a site developer with a construction company in Boston. He then moved on to development work in Lowell Mass., which included rehabilitating an old mill building. Later, he owned his own construction company, then moved to Queensbury in 1988, where he initially worked for the municipal government as a planner.

Goralski moved on to work locally for Richard Jones Associates Architects, then took a job as code enforcement officer for the town of Queensbury.

Goralski then decided to change careers, so he went back to school and received a Masters Degree in teaching in 1998 and took a job as a 4th grade teacher at Abraham Wing elementary, he said.

“I was looking for something more fulfilling,” he said.

From there, he took a job teaching third grade at Queensbury Elementary school, and then he was named Assistant Principal and Committee on Special Education chairman at Queensbury — and he served in that role for five years.

Following that tenure, he moved on to the position of principal at Stillwater Elementary, serving there for six and a half years before taking the superintendent post in Warrensburg.

Goralski said he became interested in the WCS post through being acquainted with WCS High School Principal Doug Duell and Elementary Principal Amy Langworthy through their mutual association with BOCES.

“I then researched the school and community, and I was very impressed,” he said.

The big challenge ahead for the school district, he said, is to maintain quality programs while curbing tax growth — all in the face of shrinking state aid. He said that the Warrensburg School District has lost $4 million in state aid over the last four years.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment