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Ticonderoga NCCC expansion study approved

State to fund analysis of proposed tech center in Lowe’s building

A proposed North Country Community College technical center in Ticonderoga has cleared its first hurdle toward becoming reality. The state has agreed to fund a feasibility study on the plan to expand the college’s Ti campus to the former Lowe’s building on Wicker Street. That building would become an applied technology center.

A proposed North Country Community College technical center in Ticonderoga has cleared its first hurdle toward becoming reality. The state has agreed to fund a feasibility study on the plan to expand the college’s Ti campus to the former Lowe’s building on Wicker Street. That building would become an applied technology center.

— A proposed North Country Community College technical center in Ticonderoga has cleared its first hurdle toward becoming reality.

The state has agreed to fund a feasibility study on the plan to expand the college’s Ti campus to the former Lowe’s building on Wicker Street. That building would become an applied technology center.

“I am pleased to share with you the news that our CFA (consolidated funding application) proposal for the feasibility study to investigate a multi-college/incubator facility in Ticonderoga was an approved project and funded by the state today,” Dr. Steve Tyrell, NCCC president, said Dec. 11. “We have to move forward with an RFP (request for proposal) proposal to hire a firm to conduct the feasibility study.”

If the project becomes reality, NCCC will expand its degree programs in Ticonderoga. Specific curriculum have not yet been identified, but Tyrell expects an emphasis on green technology.

NCCC has asked other colleges, both two- and four-year institutions, to participate in the Ti program.

The Ticonderoga program would be based on a similar program at SUNY-Alfred, where Tyrell worked before coming to NCCC. The Alfred program offers college-level carpentry, masonry, electrician and other construction trade training. It also integrates energy conservation, alternative energy use and sustainable building design education and training into its academic programs, focusing on green building technologies in New York State.

“The vacant Lowe’s facility has been on the minds of people in Ticonderoga,” Tyrell said when he introduced the proposal last summer. “I’ve been thinking about ways to ease the middle skills gap in the Adirondacks. I thought this might be a win-win for the college and the community.”

Middle skills are those requiring more than a high school degree, but not a four-year degree.

Jim Major, chairman of the Ticonderoga Revitalization Alliance board of directors, said the education center could bring students to Ticonderoga to study carpentry, plumbing, electrical trades, engineering, auto body work, diesel mechanics, marine technology and more.

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