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Ticonderoga’s Legacy Park gains an addition

Grant allows for new park bench

Champlain Legacy Park has a new addition. A park bench has been placed in direct view of the LaChute River Falls by the Ticonderoga Historical Society. The Champlain Legacy Park is located adjacent to Ticonderoga’s Bicentennial Park.

Champlain Legacy Park has a new addition. A park bench has been placed in direct view of the LaChute River Falls by the Ticonderoga Historical Society. The Champlain Legacy Park is located adjacent to Ticonderoga’s Bicentennial Park.

— Champlain Legacy Park has a new addition.

A park bench has been placed in direct view of the LaChute River Falls by the Ticonderoga Historical Society. The Champlain Legacy Park is located adjacent to Ticonderoga’s Bicentennial Park.

“To serve the people is a primary objective of the Once Upon a Park Bench project,” June Curtis, historical society grant coordinator, said. “Reflecting on the definition that parks are for rest and recreation, a need was identified for resting areas. The latest enhancement to Champlain Legacy Park is this park bench, situated steps from the parking area where it is wheelchair accessible and strategically placed for enjoying the view of the LaChute River Falls.”

The project’s goal is to enrich the quality of life for local people and visitors.

“Judging from the number of individuals who have commented on the park bench in the few short weeks it has been in place, Once Upon a Park Bench is deemed a great success,”, Bill Dolback, town historian and historical society president, said. “The bench will be dedicated in the spring as part of our annual Memorial Day ceremony.”

The bench project was coordinated by the Ticonderoga Historical Society and made possible by a grant award from the South Lake Champlain Fund administered through the Vermont Community Foundation.

Curtis said the park bench is another community-friendly enhancement to an historic area of Ticonderoga and plays a part in the commemorations of the 250th anniversary of the settlement of Ticonderoga. Ti will mark its 250th anniversary in 2014.

“As most people know, Ticonderoga, ‘the place between the waters’ — a name given by Native Americans — is situated between two magnificent lakes,” Curtis said. “The cool, pure waters of Lake George flow north into the LaChute River, passing through the town over a series of waterfalls and eventually emptying into the larger Lake Champlain.

“As the gateway to Lake Champlain, the LaChute River with its picturesque falls has gained much attention in recent years and has been the inspiration behind many projects such as the growth in Bicentennial Park, the LaChute River Walking Trail, the historic preservation of the Frazier Bridge and the development of Champlain Legacy Park. The emphasis continues to be to serve the people while respecting the natural environment,” she said.

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