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Older and Wiser | Kids Count

Great wisdom can be harvested from these situations and the elderly have experienced more of these dilemmas than most young people. Many of the elderly can remember the leans times associated with economic depressions and economic recessions. Wouldn’t they know how to navigate the current economic downturns given their experience with them before?

Perhaps I have a romantic myopia that idealizes the elderly among us. I grew up without elderly relatives after moving to America having had a large extended family before. To this day I can remember my Aunts and Uncles and their colorful personalities and their kindnesses to me.

One of the greatest wisdoms that I have learned from the many older folks that I have known is to relax and to not “make mountains out of molehills” all the time. I know quite a number of people who are truly stressed out. They are on tight schedules, have little time for themselves or their loved ones or to just relax and have fun. If you talk to an older person they will tell you to be “eager to come to work and eager to go home.” In other words separate your work life from your home life and “don’t sweat the small stuff.”

Perhaps the greatest wisdom spoken to me was by an elderly gentleman that I knew quite a few years ago while we were listening to a lecture about the wisdom of the elderly. He said that every age has its wisdom. No particular age has the market on wisdom. Certainly experiential knowledge is important albeit a step behind the thinking that will solve the current problem. While I had great respect for my professor all those years ago for saying that no age is wiser than another, I am not sure that I agreed with his assessment. In my life, pretty consistently, the older people around me have often offered some of the most well-reasoned and rational ideas. I still believe that experience is one of the greatest teachers.

Remember all kids count.

Reach the writer at Hurlburt@wildblue.net

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