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Turning Back the Pages

Thurman Centennial marker

The unveiling of the Centennial marker in the town of Thurman on Historical Day of the County Celebration, Aug. 5, 1913 was accompanied by most interesting ceremonies which were successfully carried out under the direction of Supervisor Charles H. Baker.

The marker was placed on the Nathaniel Griffing farm on the site of the old Presbyterian Church which was built 107 years ago and was the first house of worship erected in the town. Eloquent addresses were made by the Hon. William M. Cameron, a native of the town, now of Glens Falls and Herman Metzner, also of Glens Falls. Vocal selections were rendered by Mrs. T.H. Smith and Mrs. Charles Hall before a large audience.

After the exercises, Henry Griffing of Warrensburgh opened the Griffing homestead next door and invited the people to inspect the historical treasures it contains, the original furniture, etc., which have been handed down in the family for more than a century, together with many other interesting relics of bygone days.

Henry Griffing, in accordance with his annual custom which he has followed for many years, is entertaining at the Nathaniel Griffing homestead during the month of August 1913, a house party comprised of his nearest relatives. (Note: Stephen Griffing and his wife, Elizabeth Uhle and their nine children settled March 1, 1800 in Thurman. Nathaniel Griffing was one of their sons. Their 240-acre farm and house, which still stands today, but not in its original position, was finished in 1804 and is across from present day Thurman railroad station. The Griffing cemetery is just a little south of the house on the high bank of the big turn that goes up into Athol. A substantial concrete wall was built around the cemetery by Henry Griffing and members of his immediate family who were rightfully proud of their ancestors.)

Readers are welcome to contact Adirondack Journal correspondent Jean Hadden at jhadden1@nycap.rr.com or 623-2210.

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