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Adrian Carr: A Retrospective

Adrian Carr performed pieces from his previous recordings at the opening of his new show,  “The Hidden Art of Adrian Carr—A Retrospective 1976-2005,” on display at ROTA Gallery in Plattsburgh through Monday, May 6.

Adrian Carr performed pieces from his previous recordings at the opening of his new show, “The Hidden Art of Adrian Carr—A Retrospective 1976-2005,” on display at ROTA Gallery in Plattsburgh through Monday, May 6. Photo by Shaun Kittle.

— “You can see movement and the passion of the strokes, which has a lot to do with the emotional experience of 9/11,” Carr said. “The broken squares are like the broken pieces of the buildings.”

Those broken squares are black, uneven and painted against an intense earth-tone backdrop.

Beneath the squares there are broken pieces, above them there is a series of smaller squares, bright and bleeding.

In 2005, Carr left the city and moved north­­—far north—to be with his wife in Montreal.

He met at the trailhead to Rocky Peak Ridge, the last High Peak he needed to climb to become an Adirondack 46er.

The soon-to-be couple got to talking; he warned her about an impending rainstorm and they exchanged cards before parting ways.

Carr visited Montreal soon after that, and got a hold of her. In 2004, they were married.

And once again, his paintings changed.

His marriage inspired another two-part painting, “He Said, She Said,” Carr’s interpretation on the need for, and difficulties of, communication in a marriage.

Carr’s most recent work, is a series called “Spiritual Light,” and is the result of his life in the North Country.

“I think that the different geographical locations impact on your psyche,” Carr said. “They bring different things out that you want to explore.”

Unlike his previous work, the pieces in “Spiritual Light” were done using charcoal on paper.

The images depict a brightness that seems to emanate, or perhaps rise, from a darkness and are balanced by black lines drawn elsewhere on the otherwise white canvass.

Carr said that showing his work helps him see it from different perspectives, something Carr said he has enjoyed.

“It’s like looking at your life from a new angle,” Carr said. “ROTA Gallery is such a great space because they’re giving people like me, and everybody, a chance to do something that might otherwise have never been done.”

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