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Crown Point native experiences marathon attack

Deanne Webster finished race before explosions

Deanne Webster, a 1993 Crown Point Central School graduate, poses with her official bid number prior to the 117th Boston Marathon. Webster had completed the race and was near the finish when two terrorist bombs exploded.

Deanne Webster, a 1993 Crown Point Central School graduate, poses with her official bid number prior to the 117th Boston Marathon. Webster had completed the race and was near the finish when two terrorist bombs exploded.

— Deanne Webster expected her first Boston Marathon to be memorable, she just didn’t know it would be tragic.

Webster, a 1993 Crown Point Central School graduate, crossed the finished line at the 117th Boston Marathon April 15 before the two terrorist bombs exploded, killing three and injuring more than 180 people. She had just left the finish corral when the attack took place.

“I knew my first Boston Marathon was going to be something I would always remember, but I never imagined it would turn out this way, in tragedy and horror,” Webster said via Facebook.

Webster completed the 26 mile, 385 yard course in 3 hours, 47 minutes, 14 seconds.

“I finished the race around 2:10 p.m. and it took me a half hour to get my medal and bags,” she relayed. “I was exhausted and on the verge of throwing up, so I rushed out of the finish corral area, which was jam packed with people.”

The explosions, 12 seconds apart, took place at 2:50 p.m. Webster, who was in Boston with a friend, Kelly, was still near the finish line.

“I ended up getting lost and circling the block,” Webster said. “I ended up having to stop and ask for directions. Luckily, I was sent in the other direction on Boylston Street (where the race finished). When I reached the next intersection, I heard a loud explosion and saw smoke ahead of me within the next block. I turned down the intersection and heard another explosion at which point I freaked out and started running down the side street away from the crowds.

“There was a lot of confusion, no one knew what was going on,” Webster posted. “Many people thought it was a celebration of some sort, but I knew it was bad because they wouldn’t shoot a cannon off for Patriots Day near all those people.

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