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Notes from the North Woods

A handsome heritage strain brook trout from Horn Lake is readied for release back to the water, in order to fight another day. Note the usual white outline on all of the fins, including the dorsal.

A handsome heritage strain brook trout from Horn Lake is readied for release back to the water, in order to fight another day. Note the usual white outline on all of the fins, including the dorsal. Photo provided

Readers can find the video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuv0_cP-0yU&feature=youtu.be

For everyone’s sake, I hope the politicians remain true to their word!

The last Got Game event of the season will focus on game cooking, and it will be hosted by the fireside in the historic Huntington Lodge Trophy Room on Saturday, April 13 from 3 -5 p.m. Please register in advance at aic@esf.edu or for more information contact Paul Hai at pbhai@esf.edu or 518-582-4551 ext 104.

The “Got Game Cooking” is a timely topic, as many hunters are currently getting to the bottom of the freezer, and struggling with how to prepare the last few cuts of venison left in their freezers.

It is also a good time to learn some new recipes for cooking fresh brook trout, which will soon become a popular table fare in many local households, directly after ice out.

The price of admission, (only $5) will get you a bowl of rabbit chili, venison stew, and a beer or other cold beverage. Participants are also encouraged to provide a game dish to share if they like.

I plan to bring along a crock pot of cranberried venison, which has become one of my favorite ways to prepare the last few bags of meat in the freezer. After simmering in a crock pot for 16 hours, even the ‘chewy-newy’ twitching muscles of a whitetail are as tender as a filet mignon.

In addition to the venison dish, I hope to have a few snacks of “maple smoked trout,” if I can procure a few brookies in time.

photo

When taking a fish photo, it’s important to include familiar objects for scale, such as a hand, a paddle or a fishing rod. This fat brookie was only 16 inches in length, but it weighed over 2 lbs.

The beginning of trout season typically coincides with the annual sugaring season, and there is no better way to prepare fresh brookies than to soak them in a maple syrup brine, and smoke the fillets over the coals of a smoldering tag alder fire.

Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

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