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Crowd finds weird treasures, bargains at Warrensburg's great sale

Sidewalks were crowded and traffic was bumper-to-bumper Saturday along Main St. in Warrensburg, while shoppers sought bargains and treasures at the 33rd edition of the World's Largest Garage Sale.

Sidewalks were crowded and traffic was bumper-to-bumper Saturday along Main St. in Warrensburg, while shoppers sought bargains and treasures at the 33rd edition of the World's Largest Garage Sale. Photo by Thom Randall.

— Walking briskly nearby through a tent of antiques was Ryan Volpe of Schenectady. He was holding a case containing four projection lenses for a slide projector. Earlier, he found a rare Nikon S, the famed firm’s first 35mm camera to be imported into the US during the American occupation of Japan. He said the rare model, which he bought for $25, might sell for up to $1,800 on E-Bay.

Upstreet, Marcketta Carpenter of Kinderhook browsed through 1950s collectibles along with her daughter Alisa of Yukon, Oklahoma. While Alisa was gathering old Coca-Cola collectibles,Carpenter said she was looking for antique fishing equipment and vintage kitchen tools and signs. Carpenter has attended the Warrensburg sale for 20-plus years, she said.

“There are all kinds of things here either I can’t afford or I can’t get home,” she said. Accompanying them was family friend Lisa Pritchard of Glens Falls who found antique children's Golden Books, for 50 cents each.

Josh Persons of Warrensburg walked down Elm St. lugging a wall shelf resembling half a canoe. He said he bought it nearby from a private sale.

“We’re having a good time,” he said. “Everybody’s willing to come down on their prices.”

Late afternoon Saturday, Warrensburg Fire Chief Justin Hull poured coins that firefighters collected selling breakfast and lunch – including homemade broccoli soup and chili -- to shoppers. They also parked 300 cars in the field behind their firehall, charging a bargain rate of $5 for automobiles, or $25 for recreational vehicles. Their large lot filled up by noon on Saturday. Also, as a service to the public, they were letting anyone use their bathrooms – considered preferable to the plastic Porta-Jon booths located through town for the event.

Next to Hull was Fire Company President Kevin Geraghty, who jotted down receipt totals next to a stack of greenbacks – $20 bills, $10, $5, and $1 bills – several feet high.

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