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Moose-calling contest draws crowd to Indian Lake

Beth Petrie, of Indian Lake, attempts to call a moose while Ed Kanze holds the microphone during the Great Adirondack Moose Festival moose-calling contest Saturday, Sept. 22 at the Indian Lake Theater.

Beth Petrie, of Indian Lake, attempts to call a moose while Ed Kanze holds the microphone during the Great Adirondack Moose Festival moose-calling contest Saturday, Sept. 22 at the Indian Lake Theater. Photo by Andy Flynn.

— About 800 adult moose are living in the Adirondacks, and the number grows every year, according to state Department of Environmental Conservation wildlife biologists.

That means more human contact with the world’s largest member of the deer family. Sightings of moose are on the rise, and one town hopes it will bring in more tourism. This past weekend, Indian Lake held its annual Great Adirondack Moose Festival with a number of family activities, including a moose-calling contest on Sept. 22.

On Saturday, a moose was spotted in the Ausable River in Wilmington. A North Creek woman saw one that morning on her lawn. And another woman found moose tracks on the dirt road in the Moose River Plains.

At the Indian Lake Chamber of Commerce, nobody had reported seeing a real live moose in town during Day 1 of the Great Adirondack Moose Festival, except Bloomingdale resident Debbie Kanze.

“I’ve seen cardboard moose. I’ve seen sticker moose. I’ve seen moose chocolate lollipops. I’ve seen moose on balloons, but I haven’t seen a real, live snorting moose,” said Debbie Kanze.

She was hoping to see one that day, or even hear one.

“Oh, absolutely. I think I will hear some later at the moose-calling contest,” Kanze said.

She said the moose calling may even drive moose into town.

“Well, you never know, and Ed, my husband who’s doing the contest has always said if someone gets a moose to enter the theater, they win,” Kanze said.

Two brothers waited eagerly to call a moose into the Indian Lake Theater. Ten-year-old Andy Quodomine, of Clifton Park, had practiced all week. Eleven-year-old Cullen Rose, of Inlet, had practiced for a month. As people sat down, Andy scoped out the competition.

“I’m really excited to be in this match, and I see the competition’s getting kind of rough with my brother an all,” Andy said.

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